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Fettuccini with cultured cream sauce, shallots, chanterelles and parsley.

What you need:

For the Alfredo

  • 1 c easy soy yogurt
  • 1/3 c pine nuts or cashews
  • 1 t salt
  • 1/3 c nutritional yeast
  • 1/2 small onion
  • 2 cloves garlic

For the pasta

If you’re using baked tofu, put your oven at 400 degrees and crumble up the tofu. Drizzle with olive oil and tamari. Bake for around 10 minutes stirring often.

Place all the Alfredo sauce ingredients into the blender and blend on high for one minute.

Cook pasta according to directions.

Dry sauté the chanterelles first to cook off the water.

Add chopped shallots and olive oil.

Chop up your parsley. Once all the elements are done, place a scoop of pasta, a scoop of tofu (if using), a scoop of mushrooms, and pour Alfredo to taste. Garnish with parsley!

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Baked potato with shiitake bacun and easy cultured cheeze sauce

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What you need:

Cultured cheese sauce

  • 1/2 c easy soy yogurt
  • 1/2 c cashews
  • 1/4 c nutritional yeast
  • 1/2 small onion
  • 1/4 favorite salsa (I use Trader Joe’s salsa especial-medium spice)
  • Jalapeño or canned chilis
  • Salt to taste

Shiitake bacun

  • 2 c thinly sliced shiitake
  • Drizzle olive oil
  • Drizzle liquid smoke
  • Drizzle tamari
  • Preheated oven at 375 degrees

Other

Spread the shiitake out on a cookie sheet and drizzle with olive oil, liquid smoke, and tamari. Bake at 375 degrees, stirring well every five minutes for the first fifteen minutes, then every three minutes until done.

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The bacun will seem almost burned but will still be chewy after twenty minutes or so. Once you take it out it will get crunchy like bacon as it cools.

For the cultured cheese sauce, put all the ingredients into the blender and blend well for two minutes.

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Bake the potatoes and steam the broccoli as preferred. Plate them up and mow them down!! The savory umami of the bacun is perfectly paired with the creamy cultured cheese sauce. Zam! You won’t be disappointed.

I baked up some Brussels Sprouts as well as the steamed broccoli and added a little plain easy soy yogurt in place of sour cream. A few dots of hot sauce and you’re ready to take on the world.

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COMING SOON: A New Renaissance in Cheese

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Our Mission: To produce divine artisanal vegan cheeses for all fine food lovers, using age-old traditional methods and the finest organic Oregon hazelnuts prepared with the highest level of craftsmanship, compassion, and consciousness.

When I think about artisanal cheese making, my first thought is always of a cheese monger at a busy street market in the times of the Renaissance. She has on an apron and her hair is covered with a white cloth. Her wares are neatly displayed, wrapped in brown paper, tied with strand of twine. She’s in the middle of a sale with the local vintner who always buys from her because her cheeses are the finest and pair best with his famous wines.

The Renaissance cheese monger has a deep relationship with the land around her because if the land is in trouble, her livelihood is threatened. She knows her neighbors and her understanding of community is wide, because she depends on the connections she makes within her community to survive. She works hard to make the best quality product that she can because of her passion for her trade.

All aspects of our cheese making methods hearken back to a time when products were made by skilled workers, artisans, workers who used old and time tested recipes, workers who knew their trade like the back of their hands. And yet, while we always honor the wisdom of the past, our product also brings a breath of new life and compassion to the  traditional methods by making the shift from dairy cow milk to fresh hazelnut milk. Like the Renaissance cheese monger, we deepen our connection to our community by purchasing organic hazelnuts from Meridian Hazelnut Farm, a 48 year-old family farm right here in our Emerald Valley.

The alchemical processes that are required to make liquid milk into solid cheeses are different with hazelnut milk and dairy milk. It took me a year of experimentation to get the exact recipe right, toiling over a bubbling pot, stirring, measuring, timing the addition of ingredients down to the second. The secrets are in the details, but overall we use the most basic of all cheese making formulas to release the smooth, rich cream from the fibrous cellulose of the hazelnut. We make our cheese the way cheese has been made for thousands of years and we do it without exploiting animals. We feel that the time has arrived to spiral upward in evolution, to bring a new wave of compassion and consciousness to these processes.…and all that passion and love of the trade is evident in our final insanely delicious product.

blueberry basil

Avellana Blueberry Basil Boursault

Times are changing and people are becoming more and more aware of the effects their individual choices make on the whole interconnected organism that is our world. Organic hazelnut milk  means less exploitation of other living animals, less strain on our already overtaxed environment, and better health for you, the compassionate consumer.

Our cheese will be available at the Eugene Farmer’s Market in June of 2014 and other venues , stores and restaurants as we grow!

 

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